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Cloud Cap Inn

July 11, 2015

Steider Studios.Cloud Cap Inn Side.6.28.15

The last Sunday in June a friend and I went to Cloud Cap Inn for a tour offered by the Forest Service.  It’s only available during summer and only on Sundays.

Steider Studios.Cloud Cap Inn Front.6.28.15

It’s one of those places near me that I’ve always wanted to go see, but until now didn’t take the opportunity.

Steider Studios.Bear Grass on Cloud Cap Road.6.28.15

Bear Grass blooms lined one section of the winding gravel road bringing life back to the charred forest from the Gnarl Ridge wildfire in 2008.

Steider Studios.Ranger Ron at Cloud Cap Road.6.28.15

Ranger Ron Kikel is incredibly knowledgeable and led us through the Inn room by room, telling us the history of the Cloud Cap Inn.

Steider Studios.Cloud Cap Inn Tour.6.28.15-2Most of the interior was too dark for my camera without a tripod or flash but one of the tiny bedrooms, flooded with light from a window displayed signatures from those who stayed at the inn and signed their names on the bedroom walls.

Steider Studios.Cloud Cap Inn Tour.6.28.15-4The dining area ~ boots lining the top beam belong to Crag Rats, the oldest volunteer mountain rescue group in North America.  They have leased this building for more than 50 years as a staging site for rescues on Mt. Hood.

Steider Studios.Cloud Cap Inn Tour.6.28.15-5

Built in 1889, the Cloud Cap Inn is the country’s oldest high alpine ski cabin. It was built on the site of the first “season long” public resort at timberline (1883), a tent camp hosted by Mrs. David Cooper, of the Cooper Family which gave its name to the distinctive ridge above the inn.

The inn, built at an elevation of 5837′, was constructed of amabilis fir, cut from a site about 2.5 miles below the inn and hauled up the mountain by teams of horses. William Marcy Widden, a Portland architect drew the plans.”

You can read more here and Google for images of days gone by.

Steider Studios.Cloud Cap Path.6.28.15

Out the back door, we enjoyed our picnic lunch, then hiked this little path.

Steider Studios.Clouds.Cloud Cap Inn.6.28.15

Clouds gently blew in and we caught a few sprinkles of rain.

Steider Studios.Mt Hood from Cloud Cap.6.28.15

One last shot of Mt. Hood before heading back to our ‘city’.

Steider Studios.Cloud Cap Inn.6.28.15

By the way, we thought we had to park at the campground below Cloud Cap Inn and walk up, but there’s a large gravel parking lot you drive up to.  The road isn’t as daunting as it looks.

Steider Studios.Inspiration Point.6.28.15

On the way back down we stopped at Inspiration Point.  The waterfall and river were muddy brown.

Steider Studios.Stone Monument.6.28.15

At the bottom of the Inspiration Point trail is this stone monument.  I would love to know the story of Stephen.

Steider Studios.Mt Adams behind Burned Trees.6.28.15

Driving on Cloud Cap Road through the scorched forest was eery.  On a clear day we could’ve seen Mt Adams glow as the sun lit her up.

Steider Studios.Wild Lily on Cloud Cap Road.6.28.15One last delight, among the wildflowers blooming was a stand of wild lilies.  It was another fabulous day in the Columbia River Gorge.

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4 Responses to “Cloud Cap Inn”

  1. Coral Says:

    Oh Linda, thank you for sharing with all of us who will never be able to make the trip and tour…you make my life feel so enriched by having a wonderful friend who loves exploring to share with myself and others…hugs


  2. My pleasure Coral, I’m so happy that you enjoy my posts!


  3. Hi Linda,
    I just read your blog and it fits in with today’s Historic Hood River photo of an old trapper sitting by the fireplace in Cloud Cap.
    http://historichoodriver.com/index.php?showimage=1152#comments

    If you click the tag for Cloud Cap, you can see all of the Cloud Cap related photos posted by Arthur Babitz and the HHR crew. Many of them have comments by Crag Rat members who are very familiar with Cloud Cap.

    Also Tom Kloster did an interesting blog about Barney Cooper, son of David Cooper.
    http://wyeastblog.org/2012/11/12/warren-barney-cooper/

    Thanks for another interesting blog with photos.


  4. Thanks so much Laurene, both interesting reads! Also thanks for your plug on the Historic Hood River Site!!


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