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Most of these art glass vases are from my Celestial Series and incorporate 22k gold.  I like to cut florist’s foam to fit the vase bottom, place it in the vase then drench it in water.  As soon as the foam saturates I poke fresh flowers into the foam, creating a beautiful arrangement.  Without further ado:

Celestial series purple with green art glass vase. 7.5″ at widest x 6.5″ at tallest. $150

Celestial series purple & turquoise art glass vase. 22k gold spirals fired in. 7.25″ at widest x 4.75″ at tallest. $125

Celestial series purple and blue art glass vase. 7.75″ at widest x 4.5″ at tallest. $125

Celestial series purple and blue art glass vase. 22k gold spirals fired in. 6″ at widest x 3 1/8″ at tallest. $75

Celestial series blue art glass vase. Dichroic stars fired in. 6.25″ at widest x 3.25″ at tallest. $60

Celestial series red and blue art glass vase. 6.25″ at widest x 3.5″ at tallest. $50

Celestial series Yellow with orange art glass vase. 22k gold design fired in. 6″ at widest x 3.5″ at tallest. $75

Puzzle vase using iridescent clear with warm splashes of color. 5.5″ at tallest x 7″ at widest. $125

Clear iridescent art glass vase with 3D multi-color dots. 7″ at tallest x 5.25″ at widest. $65

Green iridescent art glass with cobalt 3D dots art glass vase. 7.25 at widest x 5 3/8 at tallest. $65

Sparkly green with yellow 3D dots art glass vase. 6″ at widest x 4 3/8″ at tallest. $55

Translucent Red iridescent art glass vase with 3D dots of yellow and orange. 5.25″ at widest x 3.5″ at tallest. $35

Black iridescent with rainbow confetti art glass vase. 5.25″ at widest x 3 5/8″ at tallest. $35

Dark plum ‘spray’ on clear art glass vase. 5.5″ at widest x 3 3/8″ at tallest. $50

Red with white art glass vase. 6.75″ at widest x 3.75″ at tallest. $65

Translucent magenta iridescent art glass vase with squares of copper-colored dichroic glass. 7.5″ at widest x 4″ at tallest. $65

Gold transitions into purple iridescent art glass vase.  Translucent purple when held in sunlight. 8″ at widest x 4.75″ at tallest. $75

Turquoise with white botanical design iridescent art glass vase. 5.25″ at widest x 2.25″ at tallest. $30

Forest Series art glass vase. Just over 13″ at widest x 8.75″ tall. Multiple layers this is a heavy vase weighing just under 9.5 lbs. $485

Don’t forget you get 20% off these prices.  Send a message if you’d like one and help me get to Norway!

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Good News, Bad News

October 23, 2010

Opening the kiln lid is like Christmas every morning.

I’ll start with the bad……

Fireborne Glass Gallery is closing its doors today.  I’ve shown there since 2001  and have always felt partial to it.  Cool little gallery downtown Portland.  I became good friends with the original owners, Lisa and Myrna and was the instigator who introduced the current owners, Becky and Len to the gallery when it was up for sale.  I thought Becky would be a fabulous gallery director/owner and I was right.  She’s sophisticated, charming, and always has a friendly smile for you.  I was thrilled when Becky and Len decided to buy it.  I’ll still see Becky because we’re friends and Oregon Glass Guild members, but I’ll sure miss Fireborne.

You know me, I can’t dwell on sad news for long….The GOOD news is I delivered almost five dozen bowls and miniatures to the Museum of Glass Store in Tacoma on Friday.  I received the order last month and worked hard to get it finished while also producing for my gallery show at The Dalles Art Center this month.  If you are near Tacoma or The Dalles, please go see all my beautiful iridescent new bowls!!

More sad news, we had to cancel Powderology at Blue Moon Glassworks in Austin.  Unfortunately not enough students signed up to make it happen.  I was looking forward to my first foray into Texas, but I’ll get there another time.  I’m sorry to disappoint those who had signed up.

Finishing with Good News, my classes in Portland and The Dalles were fun-filled, energetic and most importantly successful for the students!  Aquila Glass School hosted my Powderology class mid month where I had extraordinarily creative students.  What a great resource Aquila is!  My Basic Kiln-forming, 6 week introductory class at The Dalles Art Center will finish up at the end of the month and I’m pretty sure we have new converts to the world of glass.  Thank you both for hosting me, I had a wonderful time.

As an aside, my comparisons of Artfire and Zibbet are going very well.  In the evenings I’ve added small works like buttons and stars as time allows.  I’ve even sold a couple of things!  I’m learning more about SEO (search engine optimization) and tweaking both shops with each new page of information I read.  Do you have advice for selling on-line?  I’d love to hear it!

 

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As Promised….

May 27, 2010

…from my September ’09 “Progression-of-a-project” post, here is the finished project, finally installed this month in the Japanese Garden, located at the OSU Extension office in Hood River.  It’s a small portion of the Master Gardener’s Learning Garden which sits above the Experiment Station orchard.  My glass insert plays a supporting role in Tom Herrera’s sculpture and I’m honored to have it there.  A lovely setting, wouldn’t you say?

SUCCESS!!!

March 7, 2010

At noon I was able to open the kiln door to find as perfect a set of glass panels as I could hope for.  They’ve been cleaned up and coated with FlexTec (an anti-shatter substance) which is curing for the next 6 hours.  Because we’re short on time, I’ll accelerate the normal 4 day curing time by placing them back into the kiln at 150º for 8 hours.

Above are the two 20″ panels with the sun hitting them so you can see the sparkly iridescent glass.  Below are the two 12.5″ panels with the iridescent glass sparkling.

And in the photos below, you see the same sets in the same order with the sun behind the glass so you can see how vibrant the colors are.

They’re so much better in person!  Hope you can join us at the dedication and see for yourself!!  The next photos of these panels will be installed at Maryhill Museum, where you’ll also see the the fence and patio.

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It’s been a whirlwind romance for this project, with a very short timeframe.  Tom Herrera is transforming a fence retrieved from Sam Hill‘s Seattle estate and installing it at Maryhill Museum’s new Windy Flats Walkway and Viewpoint.  He’s asked me to produce 4 glass inserts, for the ends and center of the fence.  So, with no time for research, I pulled earlier visits to Maryhill from my memory banks.  I always loved the Loie Fuller exhibits and made a quilt honoring her back in my fiber arts days.  I have also photographed and rendered the peacock population in pastels many times, trying to capture the lovely iridescence.  Tom’s only prerequisites….colorful and 1/2″ thick!

With those thoughts in my mind, I played with fine frit and powdered glass on sheet substrate to see which would yield a better result.  Above photo on the left is the powder test already fired and on the right is the frit test ready for its first firing.

The frit wasn’t as crisp as the powder, when stacked and fused into four layers, so I chose powder, the finished sample pictured above.

Above are the 20″ panels and below are the 12″ panels, stacked and almost ready to load into the kiln for the final firing.

I was so involved with the process that I didn’t remember to photograph all the steps along the way.  Cutting the glass, sifting the powder, then drawing lines through.

Two views of the 20″ panels, cleaned after the first firing and ready to stack & fuse together.

Below are the 12″ panels, after the first firing.

Side view of 20″ panels, topped with clear iridescent glass for a sparkly effect.

Loaded into the kiln, held in place with kiln furniture to prevent the glass from flowing when heated to process temperature.  That’s where the project is now.  And will be for another day.  Waiting with crossed fingers and toes hoping  it comes out as planned, that nothing goes wrong in the kiln.  The project is due out of the kiln on delivery day, so there’s no time for error.  Which is why I chose an excruciatingly long firing cycle, ramping up at 100 degrees per hour.

I’ll post the final outcome with sun glowing through the panels which is how you’ll see it at Maryhill.  Better yet, join us Saturday, March 20th for Maryhill Museum’s opening event.  The dedication of the new Windy Flats Walkway and Viewpoint will be at 4 p.m.

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After a week of reclaiming my house after Christmas & New Year celebrations I am finally putting earrings into my on-line shop.

I’ve been talking about adding earrings for months but always dread the photo edits as I am terrible at photographing glass!

When adding merchandise to my on-line shop I’m told I need multiple shots so my customer can appreciate all angles of the object as if they were holding it in their hands.

You already know that when I make earrings (or any jewelry for that matter) I cannot make just one set because there are so many variations to be explored.

So you see the same earring in at least 3 different lengths…

…and 3 different angles for the camera.  I generally shoot  7 or more different angles, then choose the easiest to edit!

Then I change to horizontal texture instead of vertical …Oh I forgot I sold out of that style…..

So I move on to a different color and style because I can’t take more of the same today….

The Pantone color for 2010 is Turquoise, so let’s go with that…Turquoise and Cobalt dichro.

Turquoise and Purple dichro.

Turquoise and Silver dichro.

Then I start over again with different lengths.  And different ear wires!

I have a great photographer in Hood River, Denise at Photosensitive Portraits, but it means packing everything up and driving down into town.  In retrospect, that would’ve been faster!  Got any time next week Denise?

If you like this post, sign up to receive an email for future posts so you don’t miss anything.  It’s easy, just click the box at the top right of this page that says ‘Sign me up!” and type in your email.  It’s right under the yellow close-up photo of my work.

Cobalt for Christmas?

December 22, 2009

Or just reliving my Studio Sale in cobalt colors!  Seriously, this is a post for an old friend, who wanted to see COBALT. (You know who you are, Gil!) Looks like I’m way low on cobalt at the moment, but here is what I have on hand….  The detail shot above is current work done with powdered glass on sheet substrate.  Most have 22k gold designs drawn & fired into the glass.  Gorgeous pieces for home decor, don’t you think?!

I love these festive candleholders and make them in many color combinations.  I usually adorn them with botanical designs, my favorites being lavender & lilacs.  Most of my custom orders have been themes based on the client’s home decor.

I’m very low on handkerchief vases at the moment.  Those I have in cobalt are the two on the right and the very dark blue (back, left) with red accents.

This shot makes the blue vase appear almost black, but it’s a gorgeous cobalt iridescent glass

Here it is in front of a window with bright light.

And here’s the cobalt vase with white accents as viewed in front of the same window.

A set of cobalt wall pockets.  Please forgive the white price stickers, I shot these on the fly just before my studio sale opened!  The left pocket is a botanical design and the others are all from my ‘I’d give you the stars and moon’ series.  The moon is hand cut silver dichroic glass and the stars are all the scraps I made while trying to cut perfect moons.  By the way, if you’d rather learn to make you own wall pockets, come take my class (Build a Better Pocket) at the Las Vegas Glass Craft & Bead Expo in April!!

Not so cobalt but I love these pieces so included them for your viewing pleasure!

Lastly the same shot from the beginning of this post uncropped.  Cobalt is included in a couple of the pieces here because I like a contrast of lights and darks.  My current favorite for home decor is the turquoise and purple combination with gold, but it’s a bit tricky to work with.

Merry Christmas to all!  Hope your holidays are filled with light, love and laughter!!

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