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My Last Art Show

October 18, 2016

wsfaw-card-front-2016

I’ve had a long and wonderful journey with art from painting to fiber to glass with photography along every step of the way.  A year or two ago I announced my retirement from teaching and selling art supplies.  My announcement this year is the end of weekend art shows.  Yes.  This is the last one.  I’ve sold my work at weekend art shows since I was sixteen years old.  This. Is. The. Last.  If you’re in the region I hope you’ll come out & snap up the last of my glasswork.  I’ll be at the first spot on the map below:

back-card-2016

200 SW Edgecliff, at my friend Ann Fleming’s studio.  I’ll still play with art but just for myself, just for fun, and when I’m in the mood…probably only on rainy days.  I’ll still be out in the field trying to capture wildlife with my camera, and will print on demand instead of speculation.  Most of my images will always be available for you to order on paper, canvas or metal in most standard sizes.

This weekend, October 21 – 23; Friday – Sunday from 11am until 5pm.  Come say hello, support our local artists!

Coming Up ~ Fall Art Shows!

October 17, 2014

Steider Studios.White Salmon Fall Art Tour Show Card

Flying by the seat of my pants to catch up, I stayed outside too long with my camera.  Now I’m buried in my studio working as fast as I can producing new art glass home decor, jewelry and garden art for upcoming fall shows.  The first is our first – the inaugural White Salmon Fall Art Tour takes place on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, October 24, 25, 26 from 11am until 5pm.  Downtown White Salmon. One week from today!  We have an event page on Facebook with our map and more information.

A White Salmon Art Council sponsored event.

Join 14 White Salmon artists as they open their studios and a Pop-Up Gallery all within walking distance of downtown White Salmon for a Fall Art Tour.  The self-guided tour takes place on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Oct 24, 25 & 26 from 11:00 am until 5:00 pm all three days.

A preview and month-long viewing of the artists work is at the White Salmon Pop-Up Window.

Participating artists are:

In the Hatchery Studio Arts Building at 363 E. Jewett:

Sally Gilchrist, a painter/printmaker inspired by simple natural forms.  www.sallygilchrist.com

Sarah Morton Erasmus of M.E.Jewelry Co. & Atelier, will be demonstrating the fabrication of her handwrought sterling and gold jewelry at studio #6. www.mejewelryco.com

Cyndi Strid, mixed media artist, is excited to share large-scale drawings and her admiration for our native Northwest bees in studio #4.

In the Elba Building, 290 E Jewett Blvd at the corner of Estes and Jewett:

Peggy Ohlson grew up surrounded by the beautiful landscapes she loves to paint.  www.peggyohlson.com

Linda Steider offers nature photography prints and greeting cards in addition to her kiln-formed art glass jewelry and home decor.  https://steiderstudios.wordpress.com/

Jo Dean Sarins will be using turquoise in a new collection of jewelry featured at the White Salmon Fall Art Tour.  arrayofelegance.com

Barbara Murphy creates colorful, impressionistic gorge landscapes in acrylic on canvas.  barbaramurphy.net

Chris Fischer, traditionally trained jeweler, wholesaler, retailer and artist, has created works in sterling silver and gold filled for the upcoming Fall Tour from Celtic- inspired themes, accented with gemstones.  www.chrisfischerdesigns.com

Miki Caldwell is a functional potter who enjoys making tableware and outdoor decorative ceramics in her studio in Husum, WA.

Ellen Nippollt creates shelter, furniture, clothing, and increasingly, jewelry, designed to a new materialism that’s torn from place, re-paired, re-strung.

Showing in their own studios:

Klickitat Pottery at 264 E. Jewett, Ed and Diane Swick making handmade artistic and functional stoneware pottery for over 30 years.  www.klickitatpottery.com

Ann Fleming at 200 SW Edgecliff Drive, will be showing limited edition bronze and one-of-a-kind clay narrative sculptures, jewelry and handmade brightly painted pottery.  http://www.annfleming.com

Katey Ellen Price at 217 NE Wisconsin Street will show oil paintings that are the result of her love for the outdoors and her continual exploration of both the intriguing effects in nature and a variety of techniques to produce pleasing works on canvas.  kateyellenprice.blogspot.com

In other news……

Opening the First Friday in November, I’m producing work in my other kiln for…..

snowshow_emailversion

… a gallery show titled ‘Snow’ at Columbia Center for the Arts.  It opens the First Friday in November with a reception from 6 until 8pm and runs through the end of the month.  I’ve created a series of ‘Snow’ Bowls in my ‘Celestial Series’ tradition and will offer my iridescent art glass snowflakes.

Between those two events I’m delivering work to the NEW Holiday Pop-Up Shop in Hood River at 301 Oak, formerly Gallery 301!  “Locally handmade gifts for everyone on your shopping list.”  It is open Fridays and weekends November – December and open every day the week before Christmas from 10am until 6pm.

There’s more in November, but for now I am dashing madly toward my studio!  Hope you’re all having a wonderful fall.  You can see many photographs I’ve taken between my last post and this one on my Facebook Page, Steider Studios.

 

 

Oregon Glass Guild, Glass Gallery postcard front  2013

My car is packed and I’m ready to set up my booth today for Oregon Glass Guild’s Glass Gallery this weekend.  Held in conjunction with Gathering of the Guilds at Oregon Convention Center, Portland Oregon April 26, 27, 28 it’s the largest artist run art show west of the Rockies.

It takes me almost a full day to set up my booth for a three-day show like this.  You can see pictures in this link from last year’s show.

Steider Studios:  Finch in Birdbath

Knowing I’m about to miss a gorgeous long weekend, I decided to spend the afternoon in my garden.

Steider Studios:  Chickadee in Birdhouse

I noticed this little chickadee leaving a bird house so decided to wait & watch for a bit.

Steider Studios:  Chickadee Building Nest

He’s building a nest!  I love the sound of baby birds each spring.

Steider Studios:  Hummer with Fir Trees in the background.

We have a swarm of hummingbirds defending territory.  I’ve posted photos on my Facebook page, but will soon add them to An Artist’s Garden also.

Steider Studios:  Lizard

It was a lovely afternoon sharing the sun with this little guy, the birds, bees and butterflies!  Hope to see you at Oregon Convention center for Gathering of the Guilds this weekend!

777 NE Martin Luther King Blvd in Portland Oregon.  Hall C.  Friday 10 – 9; Saturday 10 – 7; Sunday 10 – 5.

In case you didn’t know, you can see many of my photographs published as all occasion greeting cards in my Zibbet shop. Just click this link.

If you like this post, sign up to receive an email for future posts so you don’t miss anything.  It’s easy, just click the box at the top right of this page that says ‘Sign me up!’ and type in your email.  It’s right under the yellow close-up photo of my work.

This spring, the Pacific Northwest Artfire Guild was discussing what to not forget when setting up a booth at an art fair or craft show.  I said I would share my ‘do not forget list’ and thought I’d share it with you too.  Rather than simply paste my list here, I want to explain my process.

The ‘bones’ of my booth are my walls and tables so those are set up first.  I use Pro Panels which are a bit spendy if you’re just starting out.  I used peg boards at my first art festivals, that slid into a sturdy base my husband built for me.  Some artists use metal grids and others hang items from their pop-up tents.  My tables are inexpensive sturdy 2′ x 4′ that I found at Costco; and I use narrow plastic shelving units as extra ‘table space’, found at Home Depot.  In my 10 x 10 booth, 4 tables nestle against two of my walls, and the lower narrower plastic shelves fit across half of one wall, leaving it more open for customers to easily see my wall pieces.  This leaves a 2′ space for my director’s chair that I bought at Cost Plus.  It’s in a corner near the jewelry so I can encourage folks to try on a bracelet or hold my earrings up to the light to see their sparkle.

Steider Studios setting up booth ProPanels

Because I only participate in shows that are indoors, lighting is very important.  I bring 4 to 5 extension cords and two surge protector outlets.  My wall lights slide into posts at the top of my booth and table lights are halogen lamps that I bought at Home Depot, plus gooseneck spotlights that I bought at Ikea.

Once the  wall lights are in place, plugged in and checked for burnt out bulbs, I dress the tables with coverings that are as close to the wall color that I could find.  I like a neutral beige so that my work stands out and doesn’t fade into a background color.  It is flame retardant fabric that I bought at a Portland fabric store.  I think I originally bought 10 to 15 yards after measuring for 8′ tables plus 3′ on either side for draping then added a a bit more for ‘just in case’.

Displaying my work is always a challenge because I want to put everything I have out.  When I do that it looks like a jumbled mess, so I’ve finally learned to only put out what fits in the space.  And trust me, it’s still a close fit!  I place my newest or favorites out first in a rainbow of color or grouped in themes.  My back up work is under the tables, hidden by table coverings; as are my empty storage boxes.

When the show opens, I’m ready with bubble wrap and tissue paper, shopping bags, receipt books, pens, a calculator, my mailing list sign up sheet, business cards, postcards of my work, any other printed material about me and my work, enough change to get through the end of the show, and my square for credit card purchases.  By the way, if you’re an artist and still using the old card processors you’re spending more money than you have to with all their fees.  Do yourself a favor and get the square for your smart phone to process credit cards.

Oh, and the MOST important part?  Smile!  When you smile, you’re inviting the customer into your booth.  If you’re having a bad day, smile anyway.  Smile even if your sales are not strong.  Even on my worst sale days, I’ve met and talked with interesting people perusing the show; made friends with my booth neighbors; added names to my mailing list; and picked up a new gift shop here and there to wholesale my work.

When the show is busy and crowds are throwing money around it’s a blast.  You can’t help but laugh and have fun all day.  If it’s slow, no need to stand around and pout, I take inventory of what I’m running low on or what color is missing from my display.  I clean fingerprints off my glass and straighten or refresh my display.  If those tasks are done and it’s still slow, I start sketching and designing new ideas.  Whatever you do, DO NOT READ A BOOK!  Should that one customer walk by who is actually looking to purchase something, you’ve closed them off from your booth.  They perceive you as not caring about being there since you’d rather be reading.

Put your work into the hands of that prospective buyer.  When someone holds your art, or tries on your jewelry, you’re closer to wrapping it up for them.  Don’t be afraid to ask for the sale.  If the piece they like is beyond their budget, maybe you have a similar piece that’s smaller, or not as detailed that will fit their budget.  Or perhaps you can work out a layaway plan.  Talk with those interested in your work, they want to know all about you; and if you are willing to ask questions and get to know them, you may be building a lasting relationship and future sales.

When you make the sale and wrap up the purchase, include your business card, any promotional materials you have about your work and be sure to put your new customer on your mailing list.  With their permission, of course!

Lastly, when the show is over, and you’re packing up, be courteous to your booth neighbors.  Don’t stack your packed up booth components in the center of the aisle so that no one may pass.  Don’t knock into your neighbors walls.  It’s not a race.  Everyone is tired and wants to go home.

Wishing you all success…now here’s my ‘do not forget’ list that I check before every show as I’m packing up, then double check while loading my car:

Booth:  pro panels, support bars, connectors, curtain hooks, t-pins, director’s chair, fireproof info, flowers, hammer, nails, screwdrivers phillips & regular, jewelry display, step-ladder, shims, lights, extra bulbs, extension cords, power strip, signage, display stands & risers, table coverings and night covers, safety pins, measuring tape, tables, duct tape, carpet, travel vacuum cleaner, zip ties, cleaning cloth, my work and a hand truck to move it all into my booth space.

Literature:  business cards, brochures, postcards, teaching/show schedules, mailing list sign up sheet. 

Conducting Business:  change, receipt book, pens, calculator, square, phone, stylus, charger, glasses, bags, gift boxes, wrapping paper, bubble wrap, scissors, paper punch, laptop, name tag, price tags, tape, tax id in WA.    

For quick custom jewelry:  ear wires, jewelry pliers, leather cord & scissors, tweezers.

Extras:  camera, water, snacks, lunch, lozenges, chocolate for guests, sketchpad.

I’d love to know what you take that isn’t on my list, or what you do differently!  Please share in the comments section below!!

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My last show of the season is now history.  I didn’t have much time to document, but I love this venue and want to share what I have.  The Columbia Gorge Art Festival is a fundraiser for the Corbett Education Foundation which provides scholarships to Corbett students.

Before the doors open, it’s quiet enough to grab a few shots.

Pam is the marvelous show coordinator and runs the event with a cool head and impeccable business skills.  She is fabulous to work with and we all adore her.

My east neighbor for the weekend was Tacy Jones of Eagle Creek Rock Jewelry and felted bags.  Her rocks, jewelry and felted bags & hats are beautiful.

My west neighbor was Laurie Miller who has been my neighbor at this venue for many years.  She has some very cool garden signs (one of which I purchased) that I loved so much, I commissioned her to make several (ok, a dozen) more for me.  I didn’t get a picture of her booth, so lifted this image from her blog.

Had a great time connecting with other artists, visiting with volunteers and schmoozing with patrons.  Next stop, replenishing my galleries; then preparing to teach at Half Moon Creek LLC in Palmer Alaska (where my class is full!!) and Pacific Art Glass in L.A. CA.  If you’re near LA I believe there are still spots open & I’d love to see you!

 

I’m feeling particularly exhausted after this year’s Glass Gallery.  The last two days were spent basking in the sun photographing birds and flowers in my garden as new colors emerge from the earth.  Today is back to reality with two more shows coming right up!

This year’s Glass Gallery was wonderful.  The artists were fabulous.  Our customers were delightful.  I’ve shown you how the show and my booth are set up, so this epilogue will simply be some of my friends & ‘booth neighbors’ who I caught when they weren’t busy with customers.  Some of my favorite artists were always so busy that I couldn’t digitally catch them this year.  Starting with Carolyn & Kathy, my neighbors … then random order:

Carolyn Crystal Handmade Glass Beads

Kathy Watne Enamels

Alexandra Farnham

Carol Carson Glass

Art Glass by Dale Rohrer with Donna Mason

Michael Barley Handmade Glass Beads

Debra Fenzl of MSR Studio

Kathy Engholm of Indigo Crow Studio and Karen Fairley of Shattered Illusions Glass

Stephanie Johnston

Natalie Vinsant of Live Laugh Love Glass

Pamela Domick

Carli Schulz Kruze, Juice Glass

Angelita Surmon

Julie Vincent of Corte Designs

Don Bietschek of Aquila Glass School demonstrating.

And just to show you I DID get out of my guild area for a couple of minutes, here is my friend, Karen Saró Troeger of Touch the Sky in the Handweavers Guild having just as much fun as I did!

It’s always a treat to meet new art collectors and network with old friends at this show, probably the largest one that I participate in.  Over the three days I was privileged to have several particularly poignant conversations.  Some of which I cannot let go of … that I keep thinking about … and am grateful … honored that I was chosen to have those stories shared with me.

Thank you.

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One week from today is the opening of Oregon Glass Guild’s 12th Annual Glass Gallery at Gathering of the Guilds in Portland Oregon.  It’s a fabulous three day art show and it’s what to do in Portland next weekend.

Glass Gallery is held in conjunction with Gathering of the Guilds, which is the largest artist-owned art show on the West Coast.  The show runs May 4, 5, and 6.  Show hours are 10am – 9pm on Friday; 10am – 7pm on Saturday; and 10am – 5pm on Sunday.

Originally started by the Oregon Potters Association thirty years ago, ‘Gathering of the Guilds’ includes the Oregon Glass Guild, Portland Handweavers Guild, Portland Bead Society, Guild of Oregon Woodworkers, Creative Metal Arts Guild and Northwest Fine Woodworkers.

The Oregon Convention Center is located at 777 NE MLK Blvd in Portland close to the intersection of I84 and I5.  You’ll find the Glass Gallery in Hall C.

The best way to see the show, meet artists and learn a bit more about their work is during the typical ‘slow’ times of an art show.  Friday during the day, Saturday night and Sunday morning.  Typically the largest crowds arrive Friday night after work and Saturday late morning through late afternoon; then Sunday early afternoon after church and brunch.

If you go during a slower time, you can get to know your favorite artist better – ask about their work, what inspires them, what upcoming projects they have, and maybe even talk about a special commission you’d like them to make for you.

You can read about how I set up my booth in this post from last year’s show:  Epilogue of the Event: Glass Gallery 2011.

This year I’ll be in booth # 29, nestled between my friends, Carolyn Crystal and Kathy Watne behind the information booth.  We plan to have a lot of fun.  Come see us first, ok?!!  Oh, and I’d love it if you tell me you follow my blog!!

 


Mother’s Day weekend was rainy, yet full of promise for the annual Plant Sale at the OSU Extension Office Learning Garden in Hood River.  Master Gardeners hurried through their tasks setting up the sale as I set up my table full of garden art.  You know I’m an avid gardener.  I was in the Master Gardener program for a number of years but alas, ran out of time to volunteer.

They kindly invite me back each year to participate in this special sale, as a provider of colorful glass garden art.  Who doesn’t need a ladybug or two in their garden?

Of course, they know I’ll be an excellent customer while there!  This year my favorite purchase was Red Wiggler worms!  I was so excited to set them free into a warm area of my garden.  I feed them daily to make sure they don’t wander off, but stay and work my soil.

This trio of sweets had a table of treats to keep our energy levels soaring.

All in all, most people that came through were buying plants of course, not art.  The worms, treats and my garden art were picked up here and there, but most visitors to the Learning Garden had their heads down reading plant descriptions and checking out the best plants to buy.

The Master Gardener’s have an annual garden tour that you should take.  There are some stunning gardens in the Hood River Valley whose owners graciously share with you for one day each year.  It’s a self guided tour; plan to be inspired by the way these garden owners have arranged their plants and groomed their gardens.
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This year seven gardens are opening their gates to you on June 18th.  Tickets are available now for $7.00  in Hood River at: Hood River County Extension office,  Waucoma Books, Good News Gardening, and Columbia Center for the Arts; in Bingen at Dickey Farms; in White Salmon at Trellis Fresh Flowers; and in The Dalles at Wasco County Extension office andKlindt’s Books.
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You can also purchase a ticket the day of the tour for $10 ‘at the garden gate’.
For more information, click on this link:  www.hrgt2011.blogspot.com

The 2011 Gathering of the Guilds took place this past weekend at the Portland Convention Center.  It’s the largest event of it’s kind, run by artists for artists in the Pacific Northwest.  The show includes Portland Handweavers GuildGuild of Oregon Woodworkers, Creative Metal Arts GuildPortland Bead Society, and Oregon Glass Guild.  It was initiated 28 years ago by the Oregon Potters Association and we other guildss have joined slowly over the last 10 to 15 years.

Above is my booth just before the Glass Gallery show opened.   It took awhile to get it to this point.  I’ll show you:

A group of Oregon Glass Guild volunteers ready to assist in the big empty building as artists arrive.

Alice Geyer, our State President along with Gayle Larsen from the Mid Valley Chapter arrive bringing a truckload of artwork.  And all the ingredients needed for our Pavilion!

The pipe and drape goes up while more artists arrive and unload their work.

Once the pipe & drape is set up we can start building our booths.  My walls & lights have to go up first.  No, I don’t turn them on until the show starts!

It’s easier if I display my wall art prior to setting up tables.  At this point, my neighbors haven’t arrived, so I can spread out.  As have the pavilion folks that are also setting up and painting pedestals.

Most of my work is unpacked, lots of tweaking yet to be done.  Where are my neighbors?

So close, but in my haste I didn’t notice  the sloppy edge of a table covering, so I had to remove the glass and pull down the table covering.  A few more things to stash and my booth will be ready.  Let the show begin!

In random order, a few of my friends and neighbors at the show.  Alexandra Farnham
shared a booth with Vandy Hall.  Blown glass.

Dianne Muhly’s booth ready for customers.  Fused glass.

Ken Hashagen and Julie Vincent of Corte Glass ready for action!  Sharing a booth with Kathy Engholm of Indigo Crow Studio.  Fused glass.

My friend Carolyn Crystal, a torch-worker had crowds all weekend……

…as did Cynthia Morgan, Becky Magnuson and Carol Carson who shared a booth.  Fused and cast glass.

Jim Aden of Jaidenglass was there early to help set up and stayed late to help clean up.  My thanks to Jim and Dean Wirst for loading my car when the show came down!

Lyn Kennison’s Blue Eyed Creations booth.  Fused glass.

Jane Godfrey about to make a sale.  She and Sondra Radcliffe, both of Ambiente Art Glass have wonderful stained and kilnformed work.

Ann Cavanaugh and Joann Wellner shared a large space.  Kilnformed Glass.

My booth neighbor, Eli of Mazet Studios had a crowd all weekend and was still selling after the show closed!  Very impressive work from his torch.

Debra Fenzl of MSR Studio.  Her beautiful torchwork won a prize in the pavillion.

Dennis Hoerauf of Nature of Glass.  I love his blown glass!

Sue Purr Designs, Sue Bradley makes cat glass in her kiln.

My friend Serena Smith working her booth filled with lampworked beads.  She was also the Glass Pavilion Chair this year.

I thought the Group Booth was particularly beautiful this year, chaired by Greg Frye.   Greg with Cindy Lacey.

Don Bietschek of Aquila Glass School was excellent at running the demo area this year.

Our  Glass Pavilion was gorgeous!  Thanks Serena & crew including Jim & Jayne Simmons who ran out to buy more paint!

This event is a huge undertaking with many people taking the reins of important tasks in order to stage a premier glass show.

I’m simply going to list their names and tasks, but want you to know they all contributed so much more than just chairing a committee.  Indefatigable comes to mind:

Charlene Fort, our Queen Bee, heading up the entire Gathering of the Guilds as well as our Show Chair for  Oregon Glass Guild.

Mike Yamrick (State Treasurer) – he who writes the checks and cashes us out!

Susan Arnot and Jayne Simmons…advertising and PR.  Did you see our Facebook page?  It’s not too late to ‘like’ us – we plan to post upcoming events there for you to follow!

Serena Smith took on the monumental task of organizing and setting up the pavilion.

Don Bietschek organized the demonstrations, including the recruitment of demonstrators.

Alice Geyer and Gayle Larsen led the mosaic portion of the demonstration.  The finished mosaic will be donated to a women’s shelter in The Dalles, OR.

Victoria Miller donated the mosaic that was displayed and raffled in the Information Booth.

Lesley Kelley organized the volunteers and I can tell you she is organized.  Her husband, Kevin was the go-to guy for errands, ran the credit card machine, and even worked security – following potential perpetrators of petty theft around the building.

Donna La Plante produced the beautiful postcards and helped set up the floor plan.

Jim Piazza and Bill Cooper were instrumental in setting up the pavilion and running the information booth.  Not to mention their sleuthing skills at following would-be-shoplifters.

Jim (our unofficial photographer) and Jayne Simmons worked tirelessly setting up the pavilion and doing all sorts of odd jobs throughout the weekend.

There are so many more people involved, I’m sure I’ve left out a number of folks.  It’s a volunteer organization and we all volunteer to make the show happen.  Those above gave their time to perform major tasks without which, there would be no show!  I applaud everyone involved for a show well done!!

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